Department Of Health Review Of The Cosmetic Surgery Industry

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A Department of Health review of the cosmetic surgery industry has been prompted by the problems associated with amongst other things, PIP breast implants, and Botox injections administered by Staff with just a few hours training. 

The rules as they stand are that doctors who carry out these procedures do not have to be qualified surgeons.   Due to an increase in our body conscious society, there has been an increase in invasive dangerous procedures, where people put the cost of the surgery over the quality of the person performing it. Currently, the General Medical Council can order dangerous surgeons to be supervised or struck off.  The Care Quality Care Commission carry out spot checks on hospitals and clinics.   Substandard practices can receive warnings and fines, closure or prosecutions. 

The General public have faith in doctors and expect them to have the qualifications to be capable of performing the work that they are intending to do, to a good standard. This is not always the case.

The review is aimed at tightening up rules on advertising and introducing tougher regulations.  Some people have cosmetic surgery to address a real need, but there has undoubtedly been an increase in the popularity of procedures for vanity reasons.

Cosmetic surgeons will have to provide more information about treatments, and warnings, and the full picture further down the line.  For example, breast implants normally require replacement every 10 years.  New regulations should lead to informed choice, and more appreciation of the risks.   A “cooling off” period to prevent people from feeling pushed into booking procedures at a first consultation, by allowing them to reflect on their decision in a neutral environment and make a considered decision, without pressure will hopefully protect more vulnerable people.

Better regulation should lead to a better standard of care.

This entry was posted in Clinical Negligence.

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