Fatal Accident Inquiry: Glasgow bin lorry crash

News

28 January, 2016

The inquiry into the death of six people who died when a bin lorry mounted a pavement in Glasgow city centre and collided with a number of pedestrians after the driver fainted at the wheel, has found that there were reasonable precautions which could have been taken whereby the accident might have been avoided. Sheriff John Beckett QC also made a total of 19 recommendations which, if followed, may reduce the chance of a recurrence of such an accident. The report has implications for Local Authorities and employers; notably:

  • drivers should not be able to commence employment before references sought have been received,
  • refuse collection operators should be provided with some basic training to familiarise them with the steering and braking mechanisms of the vehicles in which they work,
  • when sourcing and purchasing refuse collection vehicles which are large goods vehicles, AEBS should be fitted to those vehicles wherever it is reasonably practicable to do so,
  • large goods vehicles without AEBS but to which AEBS could be retrofitted, should explore the possibility of retrofitting with the respective manufacturer,
  • routes should be identified between refuse collection points which, so far as is reasonably practicable, minimise the number of people who would be at risk should control be lost of a refuse collection lorry, and
  • the potential for the presence of exceptional numbers of pedestrians at particular times should be taken account of as part of route risk assessment in refuse collection.

In addition, the report also made recommendations to doctors, the DVLA and Secretary of State for Transport regarding fitness to drive.

Forbes comment

Employers and local authorities in particular should give serious consideration to the various recommendations set out in the report. A copy of the report can be found here. It is widely hoped that if fully implemented the recommendations can prevent similar tragic instances from occurring in the future.

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