Personal

Speeding Offences

We are still available and booking appointments over telephone and video conference

Speeding offences are the most common of motoring offences. If you've been caught speeding, you could be facing a large fine, points on your licence or worst-case scenario, a ban from driving.

UK speed limits are as follows:

  • Built up areas - 30mph
  • Single carriageways 60 mph
  • Dual carriageways and Motorways 70pmh (unless state otherwise.)

If you're facing a charge for speeding, we have a team of specialist motorist offence solicitors who will help you to contest the charge and provide advice on what to do next. Speak to a specialist motoring offence solicitor on 01772 220 022 or email us.

In some cases, where extreme hardship may be caused, we can put together an argument for exceptional hardship to avoid disqualification.

Notice of Intended Prosecution

If you have received a notice of intended prosecution (NIP), this is the police letting you know that an offence has been recorded and they intend to prosecute the individual responsible for the offence. You will also receive a request for driver information. The registered keeper of the vehicle is legally required to provide the driver's details at the time the offence took place. This information must be returned within 28 days of the request. If you fail to do so, you could be charged with failure to supply information.

If you were not the driver of the vehicle at the time the offence took place, do not just pass the letter on. You will be need to complete section 2 of the notice of intended prosecution. Provide these details to the best of your knowledge.

A NIP should be issued within 14 days of the offence, if you receive the notice of intended prosecution after 14 days of the alleged offence, this could be a valid defence. However, if the officer provided a verbal notice of prosecution at the time of the offence, this is sufficient notice.

It can take up to six months to receive a Single Justice Procedure (SJP), if you are summoned to Court. If you have received an SJP contact Forbes Solicitors on 01772 220 022 or complete the online form with details of the offence and we'll be in touch.

Penalties for speeding

If you have been caught speeding, you will likely be facing a fine of £100 and a penalty point endorsement of three points (minimum) on your driving licence. These penalty points will remain on your licence for up to four years.

If you exceeded the speed limit within a relatively small amount, you may have the option to take a speed awareness course. This will come at a cost, however, it will save you from receiving penalty endorsements on your licence. You will only be allowed to complete the course if you have not already completed the course over the past three years.

If you have been driving at dangerously high speeds, you will not have the speed awareness course as an option and will likely be facing a ban from driving. If you are instructed to attend a Court date, you could receive 6 penalty point endorsements or a driving ban and a fine.

If you are a repeat offender and accumulate 12+ penalty points within a three-year period, you could risk a totting up situation which would result in a driving ban. However, for new drivers, the threshold is much lower, if you are a new driver and receive 6+ points over a two year period, you will have your licence revoked.

For more information contact our expert motoring offence solicitors on 01772 220 022 or complete the online form and we'll be in touch.

Contact Us

Get in touch to see how our experts could help you.

Call0800 689 3206

CallRequest a call back

EmailSend us an email

Contacting Us

Monday to Friday:
09:00 to 17:00

Saturday and Sunday:
Closed

FAQs

What are the penalties for speeding?
 
 

If you're caught speeding, you will be issued a fixed penalty including £100 and a minimum penalty point endorsement of three points on your license, or for more serious case of speeding offences, you could go to Court where you may receive 6 penalty point endorsements, a driving ban and a fine.

If you accumulate 12+ penalty points within a three-year period, you could risk a totting up offence which would result in a driving ban.

If you are caught driving at dangerously high speeds, in excess of 45-50% of the speed limit, you may receive a ban from driving.

For more information contact our motoring offence lawyers on 01772 220 022 or contact us online.

How long will penalty points stay on my licence?
 
 

If you have been caught speeding within a relatively small amount over the speed limit and haven't done a course within the last three years, you may have the option to attend a speed awareness course. Completion of the course means you do not get points added to your licence.

For more information contact our motoring offence lawyers on 01772 220 022 or contact us online.

Can I request a speed awareness course?
 
 

If you have been caught speeding within a relatively small amount over the speed limit and haven't done a course within the last three years, you may have the option to attend a speed awareness course. Completion of the course means you do not get points added to your licence.

For more information contact our motoring offence lawyers on 01772 220 022 or contact us online.

What is a notice of intended prosecution (NIP)?
 
 

If you have received a notice of intended prosecution (NIP), this is the police letting you know that an offence has been recorded and they intend to prosecute the individual responsible for the offence. This is usually issued within 14 days of the offence.

If you have received a notice of intended prosecution, you will also receive a request for driver information. You, as the registered keeper, are legally required to provide the driver's details at the time the offence took place. You must return the details within 28 days of the request. If you fail to do so, you could be charged with failure to supply information.

If you have received a notice of intended prosecution, contact our motoring offence lawyers on 01772 220 022 or contact us online.

I wasn’t driving the vehicle at the time of the speeding offence?
 
 

If you were not the driver of the vehicle at the time the offence took place, you will have to complete section 2 of the Notice of intended prosecution and provide details to the best of your knowledge. Do not just pass the letter on.

For further information contact our motoring offence team on 01772 220 022.

What is the defence to a speeding charge?
 
 

If you didn't receive the speeding notice within 14 days of the alleged offence, you could avoid prosecution, however if the officer provided a verbal notice of prosecution at the time of the offence, this will not be a valid defence.

Speed detectors have to be calibrated on a regular basis, so it is important the device was working correctly at the time of the alleged offence. Records should be kept however police do not have to show these records.

If you do not know who was driving the vehicle at the time and you have a legitimate reason or you were not present at the time of the offence, you could have a valid defence.

For more information contact our motoring offence lawyers on 01772 220 022 or contact us online.

Need more help?

Get in touch to see how our experts could help you.

Call0800 689 3206

CallRequest a call back

EmailSend us an email

Our dedicated Motoring Offences team

David Scully

David Scully

Senior Associate

Crime

PinPreston

Call07976 255000

Gareth Price

Gareth Price

Partner

Crime

PinBlackburn

Call07976 272000

Simon Gretton

Simon Gretton

Partner

Crime

PinPreston

Call01257 260600

Contact Us

If you have a general enquiry then please fill in your details and someone will contact you.

Call0800 689 3206

CallRequest a call back

EmailSend us an email

Contacting Us

Monday to Friday: 09:00 to 17:00
Saturday and Sunday: Closed