Latest Statistics Reveal a Fall in Employment Tribunal Claims

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Just last week the Ministry of Justice has published the annual Employment Tribunal and Employment Appeal Tribunal statistics for the period of1 April 2011 to 31 March 2012.  We were already made aware in June of the 15% fall in Tribunal claims from the same period last year and that this equated to an overall total of 186,300 claims but the latest figures do provide some interesting variations from 2010/11.  Contrary to the Tribunal, the EAT did see an increase of 5.8% in the number of appeals made.  The number of cases disposed by the EAT however, also rose by 11%.

Although fairly insignificant compared to the total number of claims brought, the Tribunal appears to have taken a firmer stance against parties and employment solicitors wasting costs by taking their claims to Tribunal rather than taking the opportunity to settle at an earlier date, which can be seen in the number of costs awards having tripled from 487 to 1,411.  It is equally notable however, that some 92% of these orders were made in favour of the Respondent.

Of the unfair dismissal claims that were brought at Tribunal, it only awarded compensation in 21% of cases upheld at a hearing with a median award of £4,560.  The average sum of compensation received in these claims remains lower than in all types of discrimination cases, with the highest award of £4,445,023 coming in a race discrimination case.  While one or two employment law cases can distort the average amount of compensation awarded in each type of case it is useful therefore to look at the median awards of which the highest median award of £13,505 appears in claims of discrimination due to sexual orientation.

At Forbes, our Employment solicitors can deal with all aspects of employment claims brought against your business and regularly tackle these issues in the Employment Tribunal when necessary.

This entry was posted in Employment Law.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *